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Infrequent Site Stories is the blog reader we need

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Launching today on all three platforms—web, iOS, and Android—is the new Infrequent Site Stories view. This configurable river of news offers a view of stories only from the blogs that publish less often than 1 story per day.

Most of what you see in your day-to-day feed is news that’s up to the minute and is probably stale within a day. Even 8 hour old news can be a problem. But sometimes what you want is an overview of the news that isn’t exactly news. It’s stories from the blogs who have individual authors, or blogs that publish only a few times a month. And missing out on those stories is a tragedy because it is those blogs that pushed you to invest in an RSS reader in the first place.

Today I’m happy to introduce a new feature that you won’t find anywhere else. It’s called Infrequent Site Stories and you can find it at the top of your feed list on the web, on iOS, and on Android.

Infrequent Site Stories is the river that captures stories from those authors who aren’t pulling from the firehose. These are the stories that are more thoughtful and more relevant days, weeks, months, or even years down the line. These stories are not to be missed. And the best thing about these stories is that there are far fewer of them than there are of your normal full river from All Site Stories.

You can also configure the Infrequent river to be more or less inclusive of content that is more or less frequently published by changing the filter anywhere from 5 to 90 stories per month.

These options are also available on all three official NewsBlur platforms and will let you perform a filter similar to how Focus mode reduces your number of unreads. It’s great to dip into Infrequent Site Stories and get stories you would ordinarily miss out on.

Try out the new Infrequent Site Stories feed, available only to premium subscribers. If your experience is anything like mine, it’ll be one of the new must read feeds in your reader.

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tante
2 days ago
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"Infrequent Side Stories" are a great idea to quickly determine the stuff beyond news. Love @newsblur for that kind of stuff.
Oldenburg/Germany
samuel
2 days ago
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I’m thinking about making the list of rivers customizable so you can hide any of the three (global shared, all site, infrequent site).
The Haight in San Francisco
JayM
2 days ago
Just being able to click/touch and drag would be great for the order of the items.
tingham
2 days ago
@Samuel Is there an open item on get satisfaction for this discussion?
samuel
2 days ago
No I'm just spit balling. Had the idea a while ago and figured it was time now since some people read every story and have no need for this special filtered feed.
dlanods
2 days ago
Please. I use All, but don't use Global and I can't see myself using Infrequent, so having to remember to aim for the central button of three very similar buttons doesn't feel like great usability given how often I'm misclicking at the moment. Bring able to move All to the bottom would be much nicer.
popular
2 days ago
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3 public comments
tingham
2 days ago
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Maybe do: https://twitter.com/tingham/status/940279104082980865 instead?
Cary, NC
deezil
2 days ago
That was what I wanted in a much cleaner way than what I was going to explain with just words.
rosskarchner
2 days ago
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I've been imagining the opposite feature-- there are feeds, where if an item goes unread for more than a day (or even a few hours, say for an evening Axios newsletter), I'm never gonna be interested, and would prefer them just to silently disappear or be marked as read.
DC-ish
zackfern
2 days ago
I've also wanted a feature like this. But I'm still very excited about this Infrequent Stories feature! Thanks Samuel!
expatpaul
2 days ago
I would also really like this feature. I would prefer a cut-off of a couple of days, but if this was configurable (feed and "stale" date) then we would all be happy :-)
wreichard
2 days ago
Infrequent stories will be great, but what you’re describing is really the feature I dream of. Right now I use Apple News (shudder)for that.
sfrazer
2 days ago
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Perils of UI changes: I keep clicking "Infrequent Site Stories" instead of "All Site Stories" because I target the area above my top feed name, not the words in the label.
Chicago
docheart
2 days ago
Agreed. I read all my news feeds and I would like the option to turn this off. I do love the new app and how it looks on my phone otherwise. Thanks!
deezil
2 days ago
Since I got this, I have clicked on that new header probably a dozen times.
chaosdiscord
2 days ago
I'm intrigued by the idea, and will dabble with it. But like sfrazer, it's throwing off my default use case of reading "All Site Stories." Now ASS (snicker) is in the middle, making a less obvious target. Maybe swap ASS and ISS?
philipstorry
2 days ago
Yep, swapping would be most welcome. Otherwise, a great feature!
JimB
2 days ago
Agreed. Damned irritating. I posted a suggestion to disable it within a couple of days of the feature first arriving.
lhagan
2 days ago
It's no help if you're using one of the native apps, but in the web app you can easily remove the Infrequent button by adding this under Account > Custom CSS: .NB-feeds-header-river-infrequent { display: none; }
hooges
2 days ago
tweeted about this exact same problem. I'm a big fan of all site stories, wish this was moved up one spot
alexlomas
21 hours ago
Exactly the same here!

Germans Use A Photo to Apply for Jobs

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“The successful application photo—quality pays!” That’s why YOU should pay this service. Screengrab: BEWERBUNGSSSERVICE.DE

For literally no reason whatsoever, I’ve decided now might be a good idea to start looking for a full-time job outside of the United States. And since my questionable life choices mean I speak German fluently, it’s time to start walking the walk of my lifelong love of punctuality and mandated coffee breaks and send out some German Bewerbungen (buh-VER-boong-en), or job applications, in the hope that some magnanimous Firma will go You know what? This Amerikanerin with the bad grammar is exactly what’s missing from our well-oiled yelling factory.

I have thereby discovered that from the American perspective, German job applications are monumentally (and unsurprisingly) thorough—some might even call them invasive, though that “some” would be us, a.k.a. people who currently operate in one of the most toxic workplace cultures in the developed world, so maybe some should shut some’s big American pie-Löcher for once and reconsider some policies that, in a different context, might not be so bad. Or also they might. I don’t know. Please give me a job, someone in Germany. I’ve got to get my family the expedient fuck out of here.

All right, deep breaths. Now, as a sometime academic, let me say I am no stranger to a long and involved process in the employment-search milieu. Your average tenure-track position in the literary humanities (and I’ve applied to a few hundred) usually requires some 50-60 pages of materials, including a detailed and customized cover letter, sample course syllabi, excerpt of recent published research, selected transcripts, and a minefield “teaching statement” that must simultaneously reflect an innate mastery of contemporary pedagogy whilst also not expressing any undue enthusiasm, lest you be more popular than your new colleagues. But even four years and counting as the Internet’s resident academic failure could not prepare me for what your average German shoe-store wants.

The most shocking component of the German job application is simultaneously its most un-American, but in an actual-and-not-Alanis ironic sort of way. I speak here of the Bewerbungsfoto (buh-VER-boongs-foh-toh), a.k.a. the required recent photographic likeness that every applicant to every job must include on the first page of his, her or their attempt at employment. (Germany, a place that literally genders the word for “window,” recognizes nonbinary individuals now, and probably also would bake them a wedding cake without making a literal federal case out of it.)

Ugh! You’re saying. That’s looksist! And racist! It is, yes—but counterpoint: Check out this study by the IZA Institute of Labor Economics, which determined that while an anonymous job application process can combat some discrimination, it often just postpones it to a later stage in the hiring process. Speaking of which, although we don’t require photos in the US (and, indeed, our hiring experts warn against including one unless we are in the looks-having business and need a head shot), our application process is rarely, if ever, anonymous, and our awesome racist and sexist (and both-ist) employers just judge us by our names instead.

Germans take application photos so seriously that there is an entire sub-industry of headshot purveyors and advice-givers, like this article imploring would-be applicants to “please smile,” which is honestly quite perplexing, because that person will literally never be asked to smile at any point during his/her/their employ.

But fine, okay, I’ll bite. The Bewerbungsfoto has to be “recent,” so it’s only fair that I include a selfie I just literally took this second, which includes a cameo of my splinted finger, courtesy of my daughter who jumped on my hand and bent said digit about 50 degrees in the wrong direction. (Yes, I’m writing this nine-fingered. Nothing will keep me from my sacred duty to Deutschland über US. Am I a hero? You said it, not me.)

Bewerbungsfoto: Rebecca Schuman, 41, verheiratet, 1 Kind, 1e Fingerverletzung.

Speaking of my decrepitude: American would-be job-givers also have ways of deducing another time-honored method of discrimination, i.e., the conceit that has made an entire Sutton Foster–Hilary Duff vehicle possible. Sure, we Americans are allowed to take the graduation years off of our résumés—and, as I’m now a year older than Sutton Foster’s impossibly geriatric character was on the Younger pilot, I’d certainly have to do this if I were applying for a nonacademic job in the US—but when we do, it just has the same effect (ATTENTION: IT’S AN OLD) without the pesky math. (Fortunately for me, 41 is still “academic-young;” my gray hairs might cause the bitchy yoga moms at my daughter’s preschool to avoid me, but they scream PROFESSORIAL GRAVITAS.)

But I still sort of admire the German system, where you straight-up have to list your date and place of birth right under your picture. Again, yes, this might hasten the discrimination of a potential Chef (the German word for “boss;” the German word for “chef” is Koch; and before you ask, if you work in a restaurant, your boss is the Chefkoch). However, is the problem really that your AfD-sympathetic manager can’t be forced to hire you, a person s/he/they will then terrorize and undermine for your entire career? Or is the problem the whiteness-centered white-supremacist garbage nightmare of “the West” in its entirety? As far as I can tell, the German system, in all its weaknesses, also prevents a lot of wasted time, a.k.a. one of my favorite German words, Zeitverschwendung (TSITE-fir-SHWEN-doongk).

I haven’t even made it past the first damn page of an average German Mappe (MOH-puh, or dossier) and there’s more, you guys. You know how there are like five think pieces a day in the U.S. media about how pregnant women and mothers Literally Cannot Even at work? Germany and its guaranteed gender-non-determinate parental leave policies DGAF—or, more specifically, DOES GAF, but only because people with kids are taxed differently and often qualify for different benefits. So it’s not a matter of Will this broad always need to leave early for her kid’s soccer game? Because first, that would never happen because Germans generally work way fewer hours than we do, and also German parents aren’t expected to glom onto their kids’ recreation activities even though doing so is soul-deadening for all parties involved. It’s just so that if hired, the person gets put into the right tax category.

If you are able to keep your jaw off the floor after listing literally every legally-forbidden and disingenuously “protected” fact about yourself on page eins, then get ready to spend some time rooting through your parents’ attic, because the subsequent pages of your German Mappe not only require an exhaustive Lebenslauf (LAY-buns-LOWF, literally “run of life,” or CV), but sometimes-notarized photocopies of every diploma you’ve ever earned, including high school, and all of your GPAs, too. High school GPA! This is largely because German secondary education is a bigger and more comprehensive deal than ours. Whereas American high school is largely just a vehicle for nascent eating disorders and virginity loss, Germans track their students at age 10, and whether (and where) one attends Gymnasium (college preparatory school), vocational or technical school actually matters to one’s employ.

Finally, any dossier worth its salt contains written references from previous employers, at least two general letters of support (that you get to read!!), a copy of one’s work visa (if you, like me, need one), and sometimes—my personal favorite for its Kafkan overtones—depending on what sort of job it is and if you’re an immigrant such as myself, a letter from your local police department certifying that there are no current warrants for your arrest.

The good news is that once you get all of this shit together, you can pretty much send the same packet everywhere, just with a different cover letter that, in blessed German tradition, is supposed to be curt AF. (Very Honored Ladies and Gentlemen, please give me job. With friendly greetings! Frau Doktor Rebecca Schuman, PhD). The bad news, however, is that I will still probably never get a job in Germany—not because I am internationally unemployable, mind you. Because I have no goddamned idea where my high-school diploma is.

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tante
5 days ago
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Fascinating look at German job applications from a US perspective. Not all is true but it shows very different priorities and approaches.
Oldenburg/Germany
lukeburrage
5 days ago
I was recently helping someone with a cover letter for a German job, and I kept saying "You're being too clever with it. Just get to the point: you want the job and you'll be good at it!"
sarcozona
5 days ago
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A Bitcoin ‘Big Bang Theory’ Episode Is Coming, God Has Abandoned Us

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Close your eyes and think of the word “insufferable,” what comes to mind? For me, it’s two things: Bitcoin lords and The Big Bang Theory.

Next week, because we have all been abandoned on this slowly-dying rock in space by whatever supernatural forces may have saved us from complete ruin in the past, The Big Bang Theory will dedicate an entire episode to Bitcoin.

According to a promotional clip from the episode making the rounds online, the Bang gang are shocked to learn that the digital currency is now worth “$5,000,” a figure already hilariously out of date and the episode airs next week. The crew is reminded that they mined some bitcoins a few years ago, and are now rich.

Glasses man asks sweater guy (I don’t know their names) what he’s going to spend his Bitcoin on (this is funny, I think, because you basically can’t spend Bitcoin on anything practical) and sweater dude answers, “A tiger.” Oh, you boys!

Things get marginally more interesting when tucked-in-sweater guy (perhaps to differentiate from regular sweater guy? More research needed.) realizes that their Bitcoin wallet is… empty. Sheldon, whose name I do know somehow, appears to know where they went but is being a dick to his friends for some reason and won’t tell them.

I would like to imagine that Sheldon is a cryptocurrency hacker, and the episode ends with him flying to Malta and never being seen again while his friends argue on Reddit about who stole their Bitcoin.

More likely, though, the show will simply introduce Bitcoin as a magically fortuitous investment to the millions of average Americans who watch The Big Bang Theory, which seems totally wise and not at all likely to lead to some yokel’s financial ruination.

Either way, it looks like this is happening. How did we get here? Where do we go next, like, as a society?

I don’t know. I just don’t know.

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tante
16 days ago
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Bitcoin and "The Big Bang Theory" together.

This is me praying for sweet, sweet death.
Oldenburg/Germany
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MotherHydra
19 days ago
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I wish this show would shrivel up and die, normies think this is somehow representative of nerds/geek culture when it is far from the truth.
Space City, USA

Tether says nearly $31 million worth of its digital tokens have been stolen after hack

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Tether, the startup company that allows users to trade and use digital tokens backed by fiat currencies like the dollar, euro, and yen, says that close to $31 million was stolen from its coffers after a malicious attack. In a post on its website, Tether says $30,950,000 USDT was taken from its treasury wallet on November 19th and sent to a unauthorized digital wallet. USDT is a cryptocurrency token pegged to the US dollar, which is fully backed by assets in the company’s reserve account.

Tether says it will not redeem any of the stolen tokens and that it is in the process of attempting to recover the tokens to prevent them from entering the broader ecosystem. Bitcoin’s price dropped sharply as a result in morning trade, but clawed back...

Continue reading…

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tante
22 days ago
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Another day, another Bitcoin fiasco.
Oldenburg/Germany
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An Ethereum Startup Just Vanished After People Invested $374K

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A startup on the Ethereum platform vanished from the internet on Sunday after raising $374,000 USD from investors in an Initial Coin Offering (ICO) fundraiser.

Confido is a startup that pitched itself as a blockchain-based app for making payments and tracking shipments. It sold digital tokens to investors over the Ethereum blockchain in an ICO that ran from November 6 to 8. During the token sale, Confido sold people bespoke digital tokens that represent their investment in exchange for ether, Ethereum’s digital currency.

But on Sunday, the company unceremoniously deleted its Twitter account and took down its website. A company representative posted a brief comment to the company’s now-private subforum on Reddit, citing legal problems that prevent the Confido team from continuing their work. The same message was also posted to Medium but quickly deleted.

“Right now, we are in a tight spot, as we are having legal trouble caused by a contract we signed,” the message stated (a cached version of the Medium post is viewable). “It is likely that we will be able to find a solution to rectify the situation. However, we cannot assure you with 100% certainty that we will get through this.” The message was apparently written by Confido’s founder, one Joost van Doorn, who seems to have no internet presence besides a now-removed LinkedIn profile.

Read More: Ethereum's Biggest Hacking Problem Is Human Greed

Even the Confido representative on Reddit doesn’t seem to know what’s going on, though, posting hours after the initial message, “Look I have absolutely no idea what has happened here. The removal of all of our social media platforms and website has come as a complete surprise to me.” Motherboard reached out to this representative over Reddit, but hasn’t received a response.

Confido tokens had a market cap of $10 million last week, before the company disappeared, but now the tokens are worthless. And investors are crying foul.

“I got scammed big time,” user cioloxl wrote in the Confido thread on popular cryptocurrency forum Bitcointalk. “This was a very valuable lesson for me, in both senses of the word.” Another user, masternode, was more measured, but no less angry. “This is a punch in every single investor's face,” they wrote.

At this point it’s unclear what will happen to the $374,000 that investors put into the Confido project. At the very least, TokenLot, the website that ran the ICO on behalf of Confido (TokenLot does this for many startups), sounds like it’s having a busy day. “We’re the only remnant online right now in terms of people contacting us asking for answers,” said Eli Lewitt, co-founder of TokenLot, over the phone. “These were very good scammers.”

While many cryptocurrencies are still trying to find a useful application in the real world, Ethereum has become a darling among financial types because ICOs allow startups to raise huge investments in lightning-fast funding rounds. But a dark spectre has loomed over the frenzy since the digital gold rush began: What happens if a bad actor is hiding out among the bunch, and simply disappears?

Well, we might be about to find out.

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tante
23 days ago
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Another day, another Ethereum scam.
Oldenburg/Germany
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EU-Gehälter-Vergleich: Frauen werden in Deutschland besonders ungerecht bezahlt

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Frauen verdienen im Schnitt weniger als Männer, auch wenn sie ähnlich qualifiziert sind. Ein EU-Vergleich zeigt: In Deutschland geht es besonders ungerecht zu.
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tante
23 days ago
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Deutschland ist bei geschlechtsbasierter Gehaltsdiskriminierung EU Spitze. Beschämend.
Oldenburg/Germany
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